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LTL Shipping Guide:

LTL also known as less than truckload shipments typically weigh between 151 and 20,000 lb. The main advantage to using an LTL carrier is that a shipment may be transported for a fraction of the cost of hiring an entire truck and trailer for an exclusive shipment. As well as a number of accessory services are available from LTL carriers, which are not typically offered by FTL carriers. These optional services include; lift gate service at pickup or delivery, residential (also known as "non-commercial") service at pickup or delivery, inside delivery, notification prior to delivery, freeze protection, and others.

The way LTL ships is, carriers collect freight from various shippers and organize that freight onto enclosed trailers for linehaul to the delivering terminal where the freight will be further sorted and consolidated for additional linehauls. Drivers start the day by loading up and heading out to make deliveries first, then begin making pickups once the trailer has been emptied for return to the terminal for sorting and delivery next day. This is why most pickups are made in the afternoon and most deliveries are performed in the morning.


So whether you have a single pallet to ship or you want a full truck load trailer, Felix Transportation Solutions is equipped to find a transportation solution that fits your needs.

How to calculate density and figure out the class of an LTL shipment. - Print this page

A shipment's density is one of the factors that determines the freight rate. Shippers need to know how to calculate a shipment's density so they can properly describe their goods on the bill of lading. The total weight of the shipment is divided by the total cubic feet to determine the density.

Step 1. Measure the height, width, and depth of the shipment in inches. Measure to the farthest points, including skids or other packaging.

  • On shipments with multiple pieces, repeat step 1 for each piece.

Step 2. Multiply the three measurements (height x width x depth). The result is the total cubic inches of the shipment.

  • If you have multiple pieces, multiply the height x width x depth for each piece. Take the results for each piece and add them together to get the total cubic inches

Step 3. Divide the total cubic inches by 1,728 (the number of cubic inches in a cubic foot). The result is the cubic feet of the shipment.

Step 4. Divide the weight (in pounds) of the shipment by the total cubic feet. The result is the pounds per cubic foot, i.e., density.

  • For multiple pieces, be sure to add the weight of each piece together before dividing by the total cubic feet of the shipment.
  • Round fractions to the nearest full cubic foot number.

For example, if the skid weighs 500 pounds with dimensions of 42 inches x 48 inches x 48 inches:
Multiply 42" x 48" x 48" = 96,768 cubic inches
Divide 96,768 by 1,728 = 56 cubic feet
Divide 500 pounds by 56 cubic feet = 8.9 pounds per cubic feet (PCF), i.e., density

Next you will need to class the freight. Use the chart below to figure out the class of the freight

National Classification Committee
Density Guidelines

Minimum Average Density
(in pounds per cubic foot)
Class
50
50
35
55
30
60
22.5
65
15
70
13.5
77.5
12
85
10.5
92.5
9
100
8
110
7
125
6
150
5
175
4
200
3
250
2
300
1
400
Less than 1
500


 

 

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